My Blog

Posts for tag: dental implants

By Eldridge and Eldridge Dental Group
June 25, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
BoneGumsandImplants-KeepingaHealthyBalanceforaBeautifulSmile

Restoring a smile with implants involves more than the surgical procedure itself. We must also take into consideration the quality of the bone they’re placed into and the gums that will surround them — the “canvas” that showcases your new beautiful smile.

Bone — not only at the missing tooth site but supporting neighboring teeth as well — is the foundation for a successful implant. Without an adequate amount of bone, we can’t place an implant to achieve a final life-like appearance. Inadequate bone can be a problem if the tooth has been missing for awhile — without the stimulation of biting forces from the tooth, the bone can shrink gradually over time. Periodontal (gum) disease and other dental conditions can also cause bone loss.

The health of your gums — as well as the tissue type you’ve inherited from your parents, thin or thick — can also determine how natural the implant crown looks as it emerges from them. If they’ve receded due to gum disease they may not regenerate sufficiently, making your teeth longer-looking or leaving the triangular bit of gum tissue between the teeth, the papillae, noticeably missing. If you’ve inherited thin tissue gums, you’re also more susceptible to gum recession and there’s less margin for error during implant surgery.

There are some things we can do to minimize these problems. Tooth removal to make room for the new implant needs to be done carefully with as little tissue trauma as possible; it’s also helpful to place grafting material in the empty socket immediately after extraction, especially if there’s going to be a time gap before implant placement. If bone loss has already occurred, we can also use similar grafting techniques to rebuild the bone.

Likewise we need to take special care during implant surgery when dealing with thin or diseased gums. With the latter, it’s usually necessary to bring the gum disease under control and allow the gums to heal first. In extreme cases, cosmetic gum surgery may also help restore lost tissues and create a more natural look between the gums and the implant crown.

Creating a natural appearance with implants is a blend of technical skill and artistic insight. Keeping the balance between all these factors will produce a smile you’ll be proud to show.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Matching Teeth & Implants.”

By Eldridge and Eldridge Dental Group
May 26, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
TheRealTruthBehindEdHelmsMissingToothinTheHangover

Ed Helms is best known for his role as the self-absorbed, Ivy League sales rep, Andy Bernard, on television's The Office. But to millions of fans he's also Stu, a member of a bachelor trip to Las Vegas in the 2009 movie The Hangover. In it, Stu and his friends wake up from a wild night on the Strip to find some things missing: the groom-to-be, their memories and, for Stu, a front tooth.

In reality, the missing tooth gag wasn't a Hollywood makeup or CGI (computer-generated imagery) trick—it was Ed Helm's actual missing tooth. According to Helms, the front tooth in question never developed and he had obtained a dental implant to replace it. He had the implant crown removed for the Hangover movie and then replaced after filming.

Helms' dental situation isn't that unusual. Although most of the 170 million-plus teeth missing from Americans' mouths are due to disease or trauma, a few happened because the teeth never formed. While most of these congenitally missing teeth are in the back of the mouth, a few, as in Helms' case, involve front teeth in the “smile zone,” which can profoundly affect appearance.

Fortunately, people missing undeveloped teeth have several good options to restore their smiles and dental function. The kind of tooth missing could help determine which option to use. For example, a bridge supported by the teeth on either side of the gap might work well if the teeth on either side are in need of crowns.

If the missing tooth happens to be one or both of the lateral incisors (on either side of the centermost teeth), it could be possible to move the canine teeth (the pointy ones, also called eye teeth) to fill the gap. This technique, known as canine substitution, may also require further modification—either by softening the canines' pointed tips, crowning them or applying veneers—to help the repositioned teeth look more natural.

The optimal solution, though, is to replace a missing tooth with a dental implant which then has a lifelike crown attached to it, as Ed Helms did to get his winning smile. Implant-supported replacement teeth are closest to natural teeth in terms of both appearance and function. Implants, though, shouldn't be placed until the jaw has fully developed, usually in early adulthood. A younger person may need a temporary restoration like a bonded bridge or a partial denture until they're ready for an implant.

Whatever the method, there's an effective way to restore missing teeth. Seeing us for an initial exam is the first step toward your own winning smile.

If you would like more information about restoring missing teeth, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants.”

By Eldridge and Eldridge Dental Group
March 17, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
TimingisEverythingWhenReplacingaTeenagersMissingTooth

There are good reasons, for both health and appearance, to replace a missing tooth with a dental implant or similar restoration as soon as is practical. The bone around a tooth socket diminishes the longer it remains empty, up to 25% the first year. And, of course, your smile is less attractive, especially with a highly visible tooth.

If it’s your teenager, though, you may need to wait on a permanent restoration because their jaws are still developing. An implant placed before completion of jaw development could eventually appear out of alignment with neighboring teeth.

Our biggest concern is protecting bone health at the site of the missing tooth. We can do this and encourage growth by placing bone grafts (processed minerals from another donor) that serve as scaffolds on which surrounding bone can grow. Grafts usually dissolve (resorb) over time, but the rate of resorption can be slowed for a younger patient in need of long-term bone growth.

Planned orthodontic treatment can usually go on as scheduled. The orthodontist may accommodate the tooth loss by adding a temporary tooth within the braces or other device that matches the color and shape of the patient’s natural teeth. The orthodontist will also take care to maintain the empty space for a future implant or other restoration.

A dental implant is considered the best option for a missing tooth, not only for its life-like appearance and durability, but also its ability to encourage bone maintenance. Timing, though, is essential for teenagers. As it grows, the upper jaw will tend to move forward and down. Natural teeth move with this growth; implants, though, are attached differently and won’t move with the jawbone. While the other teeth around them move, the implants can appear to shrink back resulting in an unattractive smile appearance. So waiting until the jaw has finished growing is important.

For most people, jaw growth finishes by age twenty-one for men, women usually faster, but each person is different. The dentist’s expertise and experience, coupled with comparisons of adult family members’ facial appearances, will help determine the right time to undertake a permanent restoration for the best outcome both for health and a permanent, attractive smile.

If you would like more information on treating teenagers with missing teeth, please contact us to schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants for Teenagers.”

By Eldridge and Eldridge Dental Group
January 07, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants   dentures  
HowImplantsMightImproveBoneHealthWithDentures

Think dental implants only replace individual teeth? Think again—this premier technology can also support other kinds of restorations to provide better stability and comfort. And, they also help improve bone health when incorporated with any type of tooth replacement options, especially dentures.

Although traditional dentures have enjoyed a long, successful history as a tooth replacement solution, they can interfere with bone health. That’s because regular dentures fit in the mouth by resting on the bony ridges of the jaw, which has implications for the bone.

As living tissue, bone goes through a growth cycle with older bone cells dying and dissolving and newer cells forming to take their place. The teeth play a role in this growth cycle — the forces generated when we chew travel up through the teeth and help stimulate bone growth. When teeth go missing, however, so does this stimulus.

Traditional dentures can’t replace this missing stimulus. In fact, the constant pressure of dentures on the jaw may even accelerate bone loss. A sign this is happening occurs when the dentures’ once tight fit begins to loosen and they become uncomfortable to wear.

Implant-supported dentures can help eliminate this problem. We first surgically place a few implants in the jaw, the number determined by which jaw (the lower requires less) and whether the denture is removable or fixed. If removable, the denture has connective points that match the implant locations — you simply connect them with the implants. If fixed, the denture is screwed into the implants to hold it in place.

So, how does this help bone health? For one, the denture no longer puts as much pressure on the jaw ridges—the main support comes from the implants. And, the implants themselves encourage bone stimulation: The titanium in the implant has a special affinity with bone cells that naturally grow and adhere to its metal surface. This natural integration between implant and bone can stop bone loss and may even help reverse it.

If you’re interested in implant-supported dentures, you’ll first need to undergo a full dental exam with your dentist. These restorations aren’t appropriate for all dental situations. But, if they can work for you, you may be able to enjoy the benefits of an implant-supported restoration.

If you would like more information on implant-supported restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Overdentures & Fixed Dentures.”

By Eldridge and Eldridge Dental Group
August 30, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
DentalImplantscanReplaceYourWholeToothNotJustWhatYouSee

If you've lost a tooth or need to have one extracted, you have to decide how to replace it. Of all the options available none can match both the lifelikeness and function of a dental implant.

A dental implant is a prosthetic (false) tooth that mimics the root of a natural tooth. Once that implant root form fuses to the surrounding bone, we attach the crown, which is the part of the tooth you can see.

While other replacement options like bridges or dentures can restore the lifelikeness of the tooth crown, they don't replace the root. An implant's titanium post can: using a minor surgical procedure we imbed the post into the bone. Because bone cells have a natural affinity with titanium, they will grow around and adhere to the post over a few weeks after surgery. This further adds strength to the implant's hold in the bone.

Although the attachment isn't exactly like natural teeth, it can maintain this hold for many years. And because it encourages bone growth, a dental implant will help minimize bone loss, a natural consequence of losing teeth. Other replacement options can't do that.

Of course, implants are more costly than other restorations. With an attached crown, an implant can replace any number of teeth. But if you have extensive tooth loss, bridges or dentures would be more cost-effective selections.

But even then, implants could still play a role. We can strategically place a small number of implants as supports for a bridge or even a removable denture. Not only will the implants better secure their attachment, they'll also stimulate bone growth.

Is a dental implant the right choice for you? Visit us for a complete examination and evaluation. Afterward we can discuss your options and whether this phenomenal tooth restoration method could help restore your smile.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: Your Best Option for Replacing Teeth.”